Winter Walk

Today Steve and I went on a 5 mile walk to Cranbrook Castle, an Iron Age hill fort.  On the way out of town, we paused to look back at St. Andrews Church in Moretonhampstead.

Along the way, we passed Willingstone Rock, a granite tor.

This stunted, twisted tree was at Cranbrook Castle.

I love walking in Britain along the old byways and footpaths, some of which have been used for hundreds or even thousands of years.  I wonder whose footsteps have trodden these ancient ways.  Perhaps they were used more as thoroughfares as people went about their business than as pleasure walks, as they are mainly used today.

Cranbrook Castle is near Cranbrook Cross, an old milestone at a crossroads.  Each side has a letter inscribed on it designating a destination.

Moretonhampstead - Exeter

The village of Drewsteignton used to be called Drew’s Teignton

Drewsteignton

Cranbrook Castle itself is quite unremarkable and  most of the ramparts are overgrown with gorse and bracken, but the location is the main attraction.  I love the long tree shadows cast by the winter sun.  When we got back to town, we stopped in at the Gateway Tearoom for warm mince pies, clotted cream and coffee.

Looking east to Dartmoor

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4 thoughts on “Winter Walk

  1. The views are so enchanting! I saw a program the other day about the Chisholm Trail. They flew over in a helicopter and from the air they could see all the depressions, some were worn almost 10 meters below the surface from so many herds of cattle. It’s remarkable how the footpath is sunken down in the same manner. I can picture so many townspeople and animals treading on those paths.

    • It’s great to see where we humans and domesticated animals have left our marks on the earth and etched our stories and travels onto the landscape, but in ways and places that aren’t too damaging to the earth.

  2. I love the subtle snow flakes falling through your pictures. At first I thought it was my imagination, or eye strain brought on by too much Googlizing. Its years since I was near Dartmoor, your photos have reminded me why I should go back there, thanks.

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