Wonderful Spam

One of the fun things about being a blogger is weeding out some of the spam comments that get through the WordPress filters.  Usually they’re very nonsensical, as in completely ungrammatical and illogical.  This one sort of makes sense, sentence by sentence until they’re read together as a whole.

“Add garlic, ginger, red bell pepper, and pepper flakes to the pan and cook together a couple of minutes, then add peanut butter and melt it.
If you find that the area immediately around your house is very damp, you can add a gravel and limestone border, which will help
with drainage. The odor can smell like moldy must or worse than that.”

Interestingly, or not, “blog spam”, or “blam” for short, is spamming on weblogs. In 2003, this type of spam took advantage of the open nature of comments in the blogging software Movable Type by repeatedly placing comments to various blog posts that provided nothing more than a link to the spammer’s commercial web site.

Of course, many people also know and love, or not, Spam (shortened from spiced ham) as a canned precooked meat product made by the Hormel Foods Corporation, first introduced in 1937.

spam

spamhusbandup

Through a Monty Python sketch, in which Spam is portrayed as ubiquitous and inescapable, its name has come to be given to electronic spam, especially spam email.

In the 1980s the term ‘spam’ was adopted to describe certain abusive users who frequented BBSs and MUDs, who would repeat “Spam” a huge number of times to scroll other users’ text off the screen. In early Chat rooms services like PeopleLink and the early days of AOL, they actually flooded the screen with quotes from the Monty Python Spam sketch. With internet connections over phone lines, typically running at 1200 or even 300 bit/s, it could take an enormous amount of time for a spammy logo, drawn in ASCII art to scroll to completion on a viewer’s terminal.

Sending an irritating, large, meaningless block of text in this way was called spamming. This was used as a tactic by insiders of a group that wanted to drive newcomers out of the room so the usual conversation could continue. It was also used to prevent members of rival groups from chatting—for instance, Star Wars fans often invaded Star Trek chat rooms, filling the space with blocks of text until the Star Trek fans left. This act, previously called flooding or trashing, came to be known as spamming. The term was soon applied to a large amount of text broadcast by many users.

Sources :: wikipedia :: Vintage Spam Advertisements

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