Winter dawn

Beyond frosted rooftops,
beneath a snow filled sky,
dawn breaks.

 

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Gonna need a bigger bookshelf

I have a pretty big collection of books by and about Native Americans.  They’ve been distributed between my studio and some of our bookcases in the living room.

In November 2015, I got them all together and made a stack of 70 books.

For Christmas that year, I asked for a Sapiens bookshelf which I put in my studio to hold all of my Native American library in one place.

I have an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of this library.  23,040 pages just in case you were wondering.  To date I have 28 books about the Muscogee ranging from our language, spirituality, creation stories and folktales, history from the 1500’s through the Civil War and genealogy.  My latest book is The Politics of Indian Removal:  Creek Government and Society in Crisis by Michael D Green.  This excellent book is is distinguished for its Creek perspective.  I’m finding it fascinating to immerse my self in  while I am working on Road to Oklahoma.

Just one little problem is that it is book number 86 in my library and I have no room for it!

So to paraphrase Roy Scheider, I’m going to need a bigger bookcase.

Gorgeous gorgets

I’d made some paper clay gorgets for my Road to Oklahoma a few months ago and have decided that I’d rather they be made from fibre.

So far I’ve tried needle-felted fleece, collaged ultrasuede and either back-stitch or trapunto onto cotton, satin or felt.

None of them are quite right and I am so frustrated.   My husband reminds me that I will work it out.  He has seen me in this place many times before!

I love drawing and meditating on these images.  I find the symmetry of the designs within the circles very balanced and harmonious.

Harmony, graphite, 2017

An amusing thing happened when I had drawn a design onto the back of a piece of felt forgetting to reverse it, so that when I finished stitching it, it was a mirror image.  Steve queried if it matters and I said. ‘Yes, it will disturb the harmony of the Universe’.

The movement in many of the designs is counterclockwise.  The Muscogee stomp dance is counterclockwise.  This is because our ancestors knew that the earth and the sun spin on their axes counterclockwise and the planets rotate around the sun counterclockwise.  The Muscogee Way is about finding balance and restoring harmony to the world.

Yesterday I watched a series of short videos about textile artist Sue Stone.
Her mantra is:   ‘Be brave, push boundaries, make mistakes’.  She advocates going deep into just a very few techniques, making way for exploration and discovery.  This makes sense, but I am still figuring out which materials to use.  I think that this is the time to step back and focus on another part of the piece where I know exactly what I need to be doing.

 

October morning

A waning sickle of moon
and a bright morning star
herald the dawn.
Jackdaws play along the horizon.

I love this time of year when we slide slowly and gently from the bright days of summer into the enveloping dark.